Support Your Sales Success by What You Say to Yourself and Others

Sales Success Accountability

It’s strange to think that the talk you have going on in your head can and will affect your success in any endeavor – but it’s true.

I’ve seen it for years with sales reps who sabotage themselves by not believing in the system or not supporting themselves with positive, uplifting ideas.

First they have an inner critic who tells them they won’t succeed – and they listen.

Then they share that outwardly to their peers about how hard the job is, or how the leads are not good enough – or how they shouldn’t be micromanaged.

Negative things you say to yourself are bad enough – it can and often causes someone to leave the sales profession. They cannot get past it and no matter how successful they are, the critic in their brain brings them down.

Critic in Their Brain Brings Them Down

It’s worse when you spread the negativity to others on your team. At one company it was Jack, who every day told his sales peers that the market was horrible and that there is no way they could build sales in the current economic climate.

Another rep told me last week that they can’t work on their sales process because they don’t have enough leads as it is. He needs more leads and has no suggestions on any way he could impact sales.

Support yourself as a seller with the right beliefs.

Get rid of non-supportive beliefs.

Examples:

1) Do you say, “I’m responsible for my results. My market is FULL of opportunity”

or instead, do you say "The market is small – this is impossible"

2) Do you say, “Nothing is more important than my success in sales.”

or instead, do you say "Sales is just a temporary stop on my way to another career - I don't have to master it"

What is your head trash right now?

Instead of letting the negative messages swirl around, counter them with positive messages. Challenge that next negative belief. 

How to Stop Trash Talk in Your Head

Next time you hear something negative about yourself from yourself – listen.

Receive that message, then immediately tell yourself something positive.

If I hear: “I knew I couldn’t do that” when trying to do something –

Now say, “yea, I haven’t succeeded in the past – but that doesn’t mean I can’t succeed now” or "I will do it this time!" 

And move forward.

Next time you hear something negative in your head about your product, or your role, or your company, see how that can be received – and then uplifted into a positive statement.

What you convey to OTHERS also goes through your head. If you tell your sales colleagues that it's going to be a long week, it WILL be. If you tell everyone you can't hit your quota, you WON'T. 

When you play for a sports team, the away team boos the good players.

No one boos the good players at home. Don’t boo yourself – support yourself.

If you are unhappy or feel no potential success ahead, reevaluate your career and your position. Maybe it is time for a change.

Remember, not only is it unhelpful for you to come into work every day in a funk, not believing in your company or your product or the system – but it affects OTHERS around you.

Are you that guy (or gal) that everyone says, “Yea, I expect that negativity from ___”

The company I mentioned earlier finally helped Jack leave by giving him more accountability and he did not want to be accountable. Once he left, sales went up.

NEED SOME HELP? Talk with Lori


Lori Richardson  helps mid-sized companies grow revenues by solving key issues in their sales department - like recruiting, retention, diversity hiring, process, pipeline and leadership. She speaks at CEO groups on topics of sales growth. Clients include companies in the technology, telecom, manufacturing, distribution, and professional services industries. Subscribe to the award-winning blog, follow her on Twitter
Increase Opportunities. Expand Your Pipeline. Close More Deals. Develop Sales Leaders

email lori@ScoreMoreSales.com | My LinkedIn Profile | @scoremoresales | G+

Topics: accountability, sales strategy

Related posts